Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘potluck’ Category

Hi everyone-

TESOL was great; New Orleans was fabulous, and we’re sad to be back home.  But, we learned so much great stuff that we thought it would be really fun to make our next research potluck about the research we actually want to do as teachers!  I was completely convinced during the conference that our teachers have so much to contribute to the field.  We are doing really interesting things in our classes, and we should be out there sharing what we’re doing.  So, for our next potluck, we’re going to share with you what we learned at TESOL and what research we’re passionate about.  And we want to know what you are excited about.  Wouldn’t it be great if we got the whole faculty involved in presenting at conferences?  We’ve got so many great teachers!

Date to be announced, but it will likely be held at Jenell’s house.  I hope you all can make it!– Ashley

Read Full Post »

Long time, no post, but here’s a quick recap of our March meeting.

We discussed teaching pragmatics, particularly in speaking classes.  Of course, teaching pragmatics is tricky because everyone has a different idea of what is polite and appropriate.  However, it’s still useful to make our students aware of these issues.

To be honest, our conversation got a little side tracked, though, because Ellen’s house was so lovely and the food was so good, and then Ellen brought out “Hop Along Peter,” and I don’t think we thought about much else for the rest of the night.  If you don’t know what “Hop Along Peter” is, ask Ellen. I’m trying to keep our blog G-rated 🙂

Read Full Post »

Mmmm...stickiness and sugar

 

Or that’s what I think.  I can say that because I didn’t come up with the recipe.  Basically, it’s your standard recipe but with more butter (which you brown) and some salt.  Don’t ever make the old recipe again.

Also, I am going to make this recipe thing work, so please send me your recipes for anything you’ve ever made at our potluck.  We really do this thing for the food, so we want the recipes.

Salted, Brown butter rice krispie treats:

1 stick of butter

1/4 tsp salt

6 cups rice krispies cereal

10 oz. marshmallows

Melt the butter and let it brown.  I’m not good at telling you how to brown butter.  I will include a link that will tell you.  Then mix in marshmallows till they melt.  Then mix in cereal and salt and quickly press into a pan.  Let it cool, or just eat it right away.

Better version of this recipe here.– Ashley

Read Full Post »

We read two great articles and had some great discussion.  Small group, but still lots of fun.  And most people hadn’t finished all the reading, so, you know, it’s okay to show up without doing the reading!  We don’t judge!

We read: “A Critical approach to critical thinking in TESOL” by Atkinson (1997) and “A sequence of critical thinking tasks” by Beaumont (2010).  Two very different ends of the spectrum with Beaumont embracing critical thinking and Atkinson maintaining a healthy skepticism.  Atkinson feels that critical thinking may really be a limited way of thinking, steeped in cultural and gender bias.  Beaumont offers practical critical thinking activities for the classroom.

Our discussion focused quite a bit on Atkinson’s piece, the more intriguing of the two articles.  While we agreed with some of his points, we couldn’t help but feel that we have an obligation to prepare our students for the activities and kind of thinking they will encounter in their university classes.  It’s all very well to say that critical thinking skills have their limitations, but we still have to teach them because our students will still be expected to think critically.

We concluded that critical thinking skills can easily be integrated at all levels and in all skills.  From simple opinion questions to requiring our students to read and discuss essays we know they’ll disagree with, there are many ways to make critical thinking part of our classroom.  It was a great discussion.  If you have anything to add, comment below!  And see you at the next potluck!– Ashley

Read Full Post »

Okay, time to get the blog rolling again…

Our next research potluck will be Friday, February 4.  The topic will be Critical Thinking Skills.  Sophia and I have been really interested lately in how to teach critical thinking skills to our students.  These skills are valued in the American university system, but they also seem to be very culture specific, meaning, essentially, our students don’t have these skills.  So, what do we do?  Exciting discussion awaits at our February potluck! If you’ve got ideas, hit the comments and let me know.– Ashley

Read Full Post »

Recipes needed

When the semester winds down, I intend to get some of our excellent recipes from our excellent potlucks posted.  If you have a good recipe (whether you attended a potluck or not), let me know.  I mean, “Eat” is the first word in our blog title.  Food is the priority.  Recipes, people, please.– Ashley

Read Full Post »

Plagiarism food!

Once again, we forgot our cameras/super megapixel cellphones, but luckily Jenell had her cellphone with her and captured the food we had at our last meeting…. at Carol’s beeyooooooootiful house!

The pictures are a bit small, but you get the idea 🙂

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »